Annual Battle River Watershed Festival took place on Aug. 18th in Big Knife Provincial Park

Around 70 people came out to the free event

By Kevin J. Sabo

For the Advance

A watershed is an area of land where all of the surface water in it ends up in the same place, usually a river, lake, or even the ocean.

The County of Paintearth lies inside the Battle River Watershed, one of seven watersheds in Alberta.

Tasked with the protection of the watershed is the Battle River Watershed Alliance, a non-governmental organization designated by the province of Alberta as Watershed Planning Advisory Council for Battle River and Sounding Creek.

Through education and outreach the Battle River Watershed Alliance teaches community members the importance of protecting these environments, and as part of the education is the annual Watershed Festival.

This year it was held at Big-Knife Provincial Park on Aug. 17th.

“I’m really happy with the turn-out,” said Battle River Watershed Alliance member Sarah Skinner.

“It’s a great-turn out for us. It’s a great way to get people out enjoying the watershed.”

Around 70 people came out to the free event.

A free hot dog and saskatoon pie lunch was provided to all, and there were many activities available for people to check out including canoeing, a guided hike with a professional biologist, a story area and more.

Although there were many activities happening around the park as part of the festival, in keeping with the educational theme of the day, a pair of information booths were set up as well.

The first tent featured information presented by Master Herbalist Crystal Wilmot of Lacombe about the uses of different herbs, many of which can be grown within the region.

Wilmot grew up in the north, becoming a medicine woman for the Athabasca Chipewyan and Mikisew Cree First Nations before going back to school and becoming an herbalist.

Members from Beaverhill Bird Observatory, which is located just East of Tofield, were onhand in the second booth providing information about their songbird and Saw-Whet owl migration studies and bird banding.

Rickie, a two-year-old Saw-Whet owl with whom the public was allowed to interact, was also onhand.

Saw-Whet owls are the second smallest species of owl in the province.

Meanwhile, the Festival has run for several years, moving to a different region of the watershed every year.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

 

As part of the Beaverhill Bird Observatory information booth set up at the Battle River Watershed Alliance Festival on Aug. 17th, Rickie, a captive two-year-old Saw-Whet owl that the public could interact with was on hand. Saw-Whet owls can live up to five years in the wild, and up to 10 in captivity, and are part of the natural habitat in the Battle River Watershed. Kevin J. Sabo photo

Just Posted

One big, happy family

A gaggle of geese crosses Hwy. 12 near the fish pond on July 10th

RCMP announces newly funded police officer and civilian support positions

Stettler lands one new frontline police position according to the Province

Red Deer up to 4 active COVID-19 cases

Province announced 77 new confirmed cases across Alberta Friday

Races resume at Central Alberta Raceways

Central Alberta Raceways opened for the June 20-21 weekend.

Calgary singer Erin Ross to be featured at ‘Entertainment in the Park’ July 15th

Roots/blues musician can hardly recall a time when she wasn’t passionate about performing

PODCAST: COVID-19 and the US Election

The Expert welcomes Burman University Political Scientist Marc Froese

PODCAST: COVID-19 and the US Election

The Expert welcomes Burman University Political Scientist Marc Froese

Sylvan Lake RCMP continue search for missing man

43-year-old Steven Hull’s last known whereabouts were in the Sylvan Lake area on May 28

After lobbying, Catholic Church won $1.4B in virus aid

Faith-based organizations aren’t usually eligible for money

Supreme Court to rule on constitutionality of genetic discrimination law

Canadian Coalition for Genetic Fairness challenges ruling

Racist slurs during Conservative leadership debate not surprising: Lewis

Racist slurs during Conservative leadership debate not surprising: Lewis

‘These kind of issues are out here’: New doc examines police violence in Calgary

‘These kind of issues are out here’: New doc examines police violence in Calgary

Most Read