In this April 16, 2018 photo, the Grand Chief of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs, Stewart Phillip, gives a news conference with indigenous leaders and politicians opposed to the expansion of the Trans Mountain oil pipeline in Vancouver, Canada. Behind is William George, a member of the Tsleil-Waututh First Nation and a guardian at the watch house near Kinder Morgan Inc. Burnaby oil facility. British Columbia’s union of Indigenous leaders says it remains opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion as Kinder Morgan Canada shareholders vote Thursday on the federal government’s purchase offer. (Darryl Dyck/The Canadian Press)

B.C. First Nations group stand firm on Trans Mountain pipeline before vote

If approved, the deal is expected to close in late 2018

British Columbia’s union of Indigenous leaders says it remains opposed to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion as Kinder Morgan Canada shareholders vote Thursday on the federal government’s purchase offer.

Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, president of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs, says in a news release that the $4.5 billion in federal money could be used instead on renewable energy that puts Canada ahead in that field.

READ MORE: Big court ruling could set Trans Mountain pipeline’s fate: experts

The group’s statement says more than 350,000 people have signed petitions against the pipeline, and there are people willing to do “whatever it takes” to stop the expansion.

Vice-President of the Union of BC Indian Chiefs Bob Chamberlin says if the federal government’s offer is accepted, the project would require a significant increase in transparency, accountability, and oversight.

Kinder Morgan Canada shareholders are expected to accept the offer made by the federal government after the pipeline’s owner ceased work on the project amid protests across B.C.

If approved, the deal is expected to close in late 2018.

The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Couple arrested in Halkirk area drug bust appear in Stettler court

Charges stem from July RCMP raid on Paintearth County home

UPDATE: 18-year-old Rimbey teen dies in collision

A portion of Highway 53 west of Rimbey is down to one lane while crews investigate

Castor’s old hospital torn down

More local history disappears

Deregulating Canada’s dairy supply could bring about negative results

A report and hypothesis paints a bleak picture with regard to deregulating dairy supply in Canada

U.S. congressman issues dire warning to Canada’s NAFTA team: time is running out

Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is expected to resume talks with the U.S.

Pair arrested in Ponoka with several weapons, face 98 charges

Two men nabbed after early morning suspicious vehicle reported, stolen weapons found

Potential replacements for Phoenix pay system to start testing soon: Brison

Testing of prototypes to replace troubled federal pay system will begin within weeks

Nanaimo’s Tilray Inc. briefly the world’s largest cannabis company

The company, only listed in the US, nearly reached $300 in afternoon trading on Wednesday

Woman who helped kidnap Elizabeth Smart released from prison

Smart was 14 years old when she was snatched from her Salt Lake City home in 2002 by street preacher Brian David Mitchell

New York books editor out after backlash over Jian Ghomeshi essay

Ian Buruma, who was appointed as editor of the New York Review of Books in late 2017, no longer works for the publication

Competition tribunal to hear B.C.-based case on airline food starting in October

The competition commissioner argued Vancouver airport authority had exploited its market position

Seek compromise with U.S. on cannabis at border, lawyers urge Ottawa

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency sent tremors through Canada’s burgeoning cannabis sector

Kim agrees to dismantle main nuke site if US takes steps too

Kim promised to accept international inspectors to monitor the closing of a key missile test site and launch pad and to visit Seoul soon.

Most Read