File Photo: Work camp for the Site C dam is a self-contained town called Two Rivers Lodge

Slide near Site C dam prompts limited evacuation in northeastern B.C.

Old Fort Road, just south of Fort St. John, is closed

A landslide in northeastern British Columbia near a gate to the Site C hydroelectric project has damaged a road, isolated a small community and forced the evacuation of two properties.

Social media posts from the Ministry of Transportation say the Old Fort Road, just south of Fort St. John, is closed until further notice after the hillside shifted early Sunday.

The ministry says geotechnical crews are on the scene but it could take several days before the earth stops moving.

RELATED: Site C dam project plagued by problems

There is no immediate risk to the residents of about three dozen homes in Old Fort but the slide has cut access to the community and the Peace River Regional District ordered the evacuation of two properties, including a gravel pit, nearest the slide.

The district has set up an emergency operations centre and residents of Old Fort who are not affected by the evacuation are being advised to stay put while efforts are underway to find a new route into the community.

BC Hydro, which is responsible for the Site C project, posted several Twitter messages Sunday saying the situation is being monitored closely but there is no evidence the slide is linked to construction of the huge dam.

The Canadian Press

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