Margaret Trudeau speaks to the audience at fans at a We Day event in Toronto, on Thursday, September 20, 2018. The federal Conservatives are calling on a speaking agency through which WE Charity paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to members of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s family to hand over documents about the arrangements. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Christopher Katsarov

Tories ask speaking agency to release records on WE’s payments to Trudeau family

Parliament is set to return Sept. 23 with a new speech from the throne

The federal Conservatives are calling on a speaking agency through which WE Charity paid hundreds of thousands of dollars to members of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s family to hand over all documents about the arrangements.

The request is contained in a letter from Conservative ethics critic Michael Barrett to Speakers’ Spotlight on Thursday that notes the agency was first asked by the House of Commons ethics committee to produce the documents last month.

The initial deadline was July 29 for all records pertaining to speaking appearances by Trudeau, his wife Sophie Gregoire Trudeau, mother Margaret Trudeau and brother Alexandre Trudeau at different WE events dating back to October 2008.

The agency subsequently asked for an extension and the committee agreed to a new date of Aug. 19. Trudeau prorogued Parliament one day before that new deadline, ending the committee investigations that were underway into the WE controversy.

Parliament is set to return Sept. 23 with a new speech from the throne.

In his letter, Barrett said the committee agreed to the request for an extension “in good faith,” and that the decision to prorogue Parliament represented “an attack on our democracy and the ethics committee’s duty to Canadians to pursue truth and justice.”

Despite prorogation, however, Barrett said there was nothing to stop the agency from “doing the right thing” and delivering the documents.

“The shuttering of the ethics committee does not hinder your ability to make this information public in order to bring clarity and transparency to government,” he wrote.

The federal ethics watchdog is investigating whether Trudeau violated the Conflict of Interest Act for his role in the Liberal government’s decision to have WE administer a multimillion-dollar student-volunteer program. WE backed out of the agreement in early July, citing the political controversy, and the program has been abandoned.

Trudeau has been a featured speaker at six WE Day events and his wife hosts a podcast for the group. Both WE and the Trudeaus have said the couple was not paid for their work.

But WE has confirmed that Trudeau’s mother was paid about $250,000 for 28 speaking appearances at WE-related events between 2016 and 2020 and his brother has been paid $32,000 for eight events.

The organization has also said the two were reimbursed about $200,000 in expenses, while Gregoire Trudeau has participated in seven WE Days and received an average of $3,618 for each event, to cover her expenses. That works out to $25,326 in total.

Trudeau has apologized for not recusing himself from cabinet’s discussions about the agreement to have WE run Canada Student Services Grant, but insisted it was public servants who recommended the organization.

Thousands of government documents released by Trudeau last week appeared to back up that assertion, but they also suggested bureaucrats may have been encouraged to work with WE by their political masters.

READ MORE: Opposition parties decry black ink in WE documents, allege continuing coverup

Lee Berthiaume, The Canadian Press


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