The tale of tax on everything: MLA Strankman

Alberta’s promise squandered by NDP government

Once upon a time there was a land that had endless potential due to its vast resources that lay at its feet. This enriched province saw varied machinations of managerial ideologies that, in one way or another, came with intended and, yes, unintended consequences, directly related to the people’s actions or lack of actions. This land was so rich and held so much potential, it’ potential was almost mythical in its stature among its neighbors.

After years of cronyism and insider decisions, the people that called this land home decided it was time for a change, however, that change was not what it first appeared to be. Without a word or warning, the agents of change the people empowered, suddenly and without prior notice, levied a tax on everything in the land; for the purposes of this column, we will call it the “a tax on everything.”

This tax had an immediate and profound effect on the very things that generated the wealth in the land that provided the necessities of life for the people. When asked to justify this burden to the good people of the land, it was only met with a contemptuous bout of name-calling and bullying.

The improperly presented intention of this tax was to force the people to cut back on the necessities of life that they rely on to survive. With resulting increases in basic life costs such as heating their homes, feeding their families, and getting to and from work, the people were angry. The peoples’ anger was rooted in the open deception by their government, who for reasons only they understand; they neglected to inform the people that they would be implementing their tax on everything.

As time passed and the peoples’ income was negatively affected, yet another insidious consequence threatened to further harm the people of this land. As time passed and investment dollars dried up in this land of opportunity and wealth, the people were hit with yet another consequence of the tax on everything.

This richly endowed land had resources that people in other lands sought. Now however, the past actions of some of their agents of change had dire negative long-lasting impacts on getting those products to other lands. Between their tax on everything and their past actions protesting the very things that contributed to their own enrichment, the once prosperous land saw its people unemployed at record levels.

The government of this land liked to regale the people with tales of woe when pressed about their fiscal status and the negative effects they have had on the people of their land. The tale they spun was one of fantasy with no acceptance of personal responsibility.

Perhaps if the people in this land’s current government had spent more time moving things forward in the peoples’ best interests rather than protesting and putting a tax on everything, the people of that land would not be facing the current fiscal slide they’re currently on.

Once upon a time there was a land of promise and unlimited potential. I’m confident that the people of that land will be more cautious and they won’t make the same mistake again.

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