Vancouver hockey fans bid fond farewell to Sedin twins

Endless class and mind-bending goals — what fans will miss the most about Daniel and Henrik Sedin.

Endless class and mind-bending goals — that’s what Vancouver Canucks fans say they love and will miss the most about Daniel and Henrik Sedin.

As the 37-year-old twin brothers prepared to take the ice in their final home game on Thursday, fans gathered outside Rogers Arena, many dressed in blue Canucks jerseys emblazoned with the Sedins’ numbers, 22 and 33.

Related: Daniel and Henrik Sedin steal the show in final home game with Canucks

Some spoke animatedly about their favourite goals, while others talked about meeting the brothers through their tireless work in the community.

Martin Ogley, 61, has been a Canucks fan since the team entered the league in 1970.

The team has a number of bright young stars coming up, but watching the Sedins play in Vancouver for the last time will be emotional, Ogley said before the game.

There’s something special about the Swedish brothers, he added.

“Everybody says they have an aura about them, they’re just down to earth,” said Ogley, who met Henrik Sedin at an amusement park last September. “He’s quite a bit taller than he looks on TV.”

Vincent Kwong, 21, bought tickets last December to the game, just in case it turned out to be the twins’ last appearance.

The Sedins have been huge role models in the community, he said, and they’ve taken fans on an emotional roller-coaster over the years.

“There are so many memories in the 2011 (Stanley Cup) run,” Kwong said. ”It was just so close. I know they were probably so devastated, so hopefully we can show them some love today.”

Ameena Althullah has been watching the Sedins play since she was little and the 23-year-old still remembers watching Daniel Sedin score an unbelievable goal against the Calgary Flames in 2010, a point that earned him a hat trick.

“That beautiful goal, in between the legs. Can’t forget it,” she said.

Althullah said the game would be emotional for her.

“They mean a lot to me,” she said. “I’ll miss them a lot.”

The Sedins’ last game was a family affair for Susan Young, who brought her three daughters. The girls made signs thanking the brothers for their time with the Canucks.

“I feel like it’s a privilege to have ever watched them play here,” Young said. “It was a privilege that they came to Vancouver and we could watch such talent. It was just crazy … They just have this uncanny ability to play like no other.”

Every goal the brothers scored was special, said 10-year-old Anna Young. She expected to be in tears by the end of the game.

“I’m going to be like ‘I can’t believe it’s their last game!’ I thought they were going to play forever and ever and ever.”

Hockey has been a passion for Jess Succamore since 1952. He watched his first game three weeks after arriving in Canada from England.

“I fell in love with the game, ” he said. “Can’t stand up on ice skates, but really appreciate good talent. And the twins are the best, as far as I’m concerned.”

Gemma Karstens-Smith, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Castor’s old hospital torn down

More local history disappears

Deregulating Canada’s dairy supply could bring about negative results

A report and hypothesis paints a bleak picture with regard to deregulating dairy supply in Canada

To repair damage done by NDP we will need experienced MLAs: MLA Strankman

Experience needed to bring back the Alberta Advantage

U.S. congressman issues dire warning to Canada’s NAFTA team: time is running out

Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is expected to resume talks with the U.S.

B.C. cannabis producer Tilray hits at $20-billion high as stock price explodes

This is the first export of a cannabis product from a Canadian company to the U.S.

‘Sesame Street’ wants to clarify: Bert and Ernie aren’t gay

The characters are best friends and have many human traits but “remain puppets, and do not have a sexual orientation”

Canadian air force short 275 pilots

Attrition outpaces recruitment and training claims Air Force

WATCH: 2010 Olympic architect John Furlong inspires Red Deerians at Chamber event

Furlong suggests Red Deer should get involved with Calgary’s 2026 Olympic bid

Researchers tag great white shark in Atlantic Canada

Information will be used to learn more about where white sharks move in Canadian waters

Mix-up of bodies leads to funeral home reforms in Nova Scotia

One woman was was mistakenly cremated, another was embalmed and presented to family members during a visitation that went horribly wrong

Federal stats show slight increase in irregular migrant claims in August

113 extra people tried to cross the Canadian border last month

Most Read